31 July 2014
   
New Zimbabwe Header
Zimbabweans held over platinum in SA
July 31: Bob throws party as poor suffer
Supreme Court rejects Moyo poll appeal
Watchdog voices poll reform concerns
Don’t be fooled, top court pro-Zanu PF
'Miracle' oil a hit in bleak Zimbabwe
Ex-ZRP man jailed in UK for passport fraud
Bail reprieve for fraud accused Kadungure
MORE NEWS
Zimplats to spend $690m on refinery
Econet’s MasterCard to ease need for cash
MORE BUSINESS
Tuku in UK for Leicester, Luton shows
Rapper Shastro turns US ‘refugee’?
MORE SHOWBIZ
Mahachi: Sundowns say Monaco silent
Harare City confirm Mawiwi sacking
MORE SPORTS
Please let’s stop the carnage on our roads
Zim: A model of how to waste opportunity
MORE OPINION
 
Tsvangirai fails to inspire in London
ZimRights, was that really your opinion?
MORE COLUMNISTS
 
 
Gayigusu fingered in photographer's arrest


Macabre killings ... Esigodini, once known as Essexvale, had a big white community in 1980s

18/02/2013 00:00:00
by Staff Reporter
 
Massacre ... A 1980s picture of Esigodini, formerly known as Essexvale
 
RELATED STORIES

A SOUTH African photographer and his Zimbabwean guide have been fined US$100 by a court in Esigodini, Matabeleland South, for taking pictures of a gravesite where 16 whites were massacred by alleged dissident ex-ZIPRA fighters in 1987.

David Andrew Joseph Bernard, 37, of Pipers Close, Kommietjie, Cape Town, and Zimbabwe-born Guide Ncube, 28, now resident in Johannesburg, admitted practising journalism without accreditation before Esigodini resident magistrate Lungile Ncube on February 13.

They were ordered to pay the fines or spend 90 days in jail.

Prosecutors have confirmed that police were called to Adams Farm in Esigodini on February 9 this month by the alleged mastermind of the massacre – Morgan Sango Nkomo aka Gayigusu.

Gayigusu, who was pardoned by President Robert Mugabe as part of a unity deal between ZAPU and ZANU 1987, now lives in Esigodini and is a senior Zanu PF official in the district.

Bernard and Ncube entered the country through the Beitbridge Border Post before proceeding to Adams Farm where they interviewed a farmer and took dozens of pictures of the site where eight of the 16 missionaries were brutally killed and buried.

The other eight were killed at Olive Tree Farm nearby.
 
Locals, prosecutors said, alerted Gayigusu who called the police, but the two men had left by the time investigators arrived.
 
Police finally tracked them down on February 11.

Esigodini, a small town about 50km south of Bulawayo, hit international headlines in November 1987 when a dispute between the missionaries and “squatters” over grazing land ended in bloody scenes.

The government had given the black settlers a deadline to leave the farms, but they enlisted the help of so-called dissidents – renegade elements of the former liberation movement ZIPRA – who carried out some of the most macabre mass killings in independent Zimbabwe.

Witnesses told how the Christian missionaries, hands tied behind their backs, were led, one by one, into a room where they were hacked to death with machetes by a group of close to 20 men whose leader was believed to have been Gayigusu, who eluded capture and never stood trial.

Among the dead were two Americans.



Advertisement


 
Email this to a friend Printable Version Discuss This Story
Share this article:

Digg it

Del.icio.us

Reddit

Newsvine

Nowpublic

Stumbleupon

Face Book

Myspace

Fark
 
 
 
comments powered by Disqus
 
RSS NewsTicker