24 August 2017
   
Grace evictees homes raided, destroyed
DisGrace: Linda et al say sorry to SA
ZPF youths shocked whites still own farms
Govt lying, GMO harmless: UZ prof
ZRP Byo better than Harare cops: MDC-T
Traffic cops gang up to gouge man’s eye
Cops quiz journo over UK-based party leader
Sadc must ensure free 2018 polls, MDC-T
MORE NEWS
Maize deliveries exceed 500k tonnes
Life assurance Q1 premium income down 6pct
MORE BUSINESS
Big gig as Byo’s Skyz Metro FM turns one
UK: Eats, jive and joy at 2017 Zimfest
MORE SHOWBIZ
Kwese TV brings African boxers to Hre
Highlanders bite the dust as Caps win
MORE SPORTS
DisGrace: When not even Charamba can defend
Amai Mugabe Vs Far-Right Idealism
MORE OPINION
 
Zim’s silly season in politics continues
Unpacking the monster called Zanu PF
MORE COLUMNISTS
 
 
Health Crisis: Less than 1 Doc/2500 patients
31/12/2016 00:00:00
by Staff Reporter
 
 
RELATED STORIES
Doctors call off three week strike
Doctors’ strike: Government gives in
Doctors defy CIO as seniors join strike

ZIMBABWE continues to operate without enough medical doctors manning its hospitals amid revelations the current doctor to patient ratio stood at an alarming less than one doctor per 2 500 patients.

This was revealed recently by Deputy Minister of Health and Child Care Aldrin Musiiwa who said the ideal ratio was at least three doctors per every 1 000 population.  

“Well, in terms of ratio it is 0.0792/1000 population. To put it more simply, we have got less than one doctor for every 2 500 people," Musiiwa said.

He was responding to a question in parliament by Southerton MP, Gift Chimanikire who had asked the health minister to state the current doctor to patient ratio in the country.

Chimanikire has also asked the minister to state the ideal ratio and what steps the government was taking to improve on the situation.

Musiiwa said the country was churning out an average of 360 doctors every year but most of them were being lost to better paying countries.

This, he said, was also caused by lack of enough posts within the profession locally to absorb the newly trained doctors.

He said his ministry was currently lobbying for Treasury to create more posts for the employment of more doctors.

“Actually, in terms of training, we are currently graduating about 360 doctors every year and the problem then comes with retention. Once we have graduated these doctors and deployed them in the system, we are losing a lot of doctors both to the region and internationally," he said.

“Although the replacement rate is okay, we are not retaining enough doctors in the country. So, until we have enough money in Treasury to create more posts, it is going to take some time until we reach the required ratio.”

Musiiwa admitted poor remuneration was pushing trained medical personnel outside the country's borders adding that it was a tall order to encourage them to offer their services within when the economic situation remains in the doldrums.

He added: "However, what we have done as a Ministry, in respect of junior doctors, we have provided accommodation within the institutions which they work on at lower rates.  

"We have also allowed them vehicle loans as a way of retaining them. As to the salaries that we can give them, that is an issue of Treasury."



Advertisement

The country's health delivery system remains constrained with junior doctors who have chosen to remain in the country often engaging in repeated job actions over poor remuneration.

President Robert Mugabe and top government officials have often been condemned for abandoning the country's deteriorating health systems to seek treatment abroad, quite often at tax payers' expense.

Local hospitals have been condemned as death centres as patients quite often meet their death as a result of lack of medicine, poor equipment and less experienced staff.

 


 
Email this to a friend Printable Version Discuss This Story
Share this article:

Digg it

Del.icio.us

Reddit

Newsvine

Nowpublic

Stumbleupon

Face Book

Myspace

Fark

 
 
 
comments powered by Disqus
 
RSS NewsTicker