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Zimbabweans squeezed too much by government, says Zanu PF legislator

12/02/2017 00:00:00
by Manicaland Correspondent
 
Zanu PF legislator for Mutasa South Irene Zindi
 
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MUTARE: Zanu PF legislator for Mutasa South Irene Zindi has said Zimbabweans have been squeezed too much by the government and should now be spared further taxation.

Government recently enacted statutory 20 of 2017 imposing 15% VAT on all on zero rated consumer goods.

The administration backtracked after the move sparked a public outcry and saw a sharp increase in prices of cereals and meat.

“After my contribution on Finance Bill in the House of Assembly, the minister of Finance suspended indefinitely statutory instrument 20 of 2017 imposing 15% VAT on all zero-rated consumer goods,” said Zindi on social media.

She commended Finance minister Patrick Chinamasa for shelving the idea, saying “it is common knowledge that Zimbabweans are heavily taxed in the SADC region if not the world all over”.

A survey carried by this publication revealed that most shops here increased prices following the announcement and have yet to reduce after Chinamasa shelved the decision.

Most local people in this eastern border city are now relying on groceries from neighbouring Mozambique which are relatively cheaper than in Zimbabwe.

The Mozambican metical is trading at MT70 against the greenback and locals have taken advantage of this to smuggle basic commodities from across the border.

Following the move to impose the 15 percent tax, cases of smuggling shot through the roof with goods such as margarine, cooking oil, cereals, and fuel and beverages being rustled into the country.



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