New Zimbabwe.com

August 1 victim compensation: MDC slams ‘hypocrite’ Mnangagwa

By Staff Reporter


THE MDC Sunday slammed President Emmerson Mnangagwa for alleged hypocrisy through his apparent show of compassion for victims of the August 1, 2018 post-election army shootings when in fact, his regime continued to kill more Zimbabweans in the same manner.

This comes after government was weekend said to have started compensating families of six people who were gunned down by the army during the post-election violence and 29 who suffered gunshot wounds.

According to the justice ministry, the dead victims’ direct dependants will also be assisted with school fee payments.

Those who only suffered gunshot wounds will also be reimbursed in terms of what they spent on medical bills.

The decision to compensate victims of the disaster is part of the recommendations made by a commission of inquiry that was led by former South African President Kgalema Motlanthe.

MDC spokesperson Jacob Mafume Sunday felt Mnangagwa was insincere in his conduct.

“Mnangagwa set up a commission to investigate the killing of people and before the ink had dried on the report of the commission, his government killed more people. That is inconsistency,” the MDC spokesperson told NewZimbabwe.com.

“Now he is talking about compensation. Why should the tax payer pay when no one has owned up for accountability yet? What happened to the officials that committed the killings? What has happened to the officials that committed the other (January) killings?

“This does not make sense and only adds salt to injury.”

In past comments, Mnangagwa has been wishy-washy on the killing of 17 civilians by security forces during Zimbabwe’s ill-fated January job stay away.

Mnangagwa has, on one hand, defended Zimbabwean troops who committed acts of murder, torture and alleged rape, while on the other hand, he has condemned the punitive army response to public disobedience.

The Zanu PF number 1 is keen to portray a national leader who wants to break from Zimbabwe’s bitter past under his predecessor Robert Mugabe.

Observers say the use of live ammunition to deal with anti-government protests by unarmed civilians showed signs of a ruthless leader who was ready to spill blood to protect his rule.

The decision to compensate a handful victims of army brutality has also earned scorn from survivors of the 1980s Gukurahundi army massacres who feel they also deserved compensation for their losses.