Columnists

Columnists

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson

Who is to blame for Zimbabwe’s land reform disaster?

By Tafi Mhaka On August 31, the government of Zimbabwe announced that foreign white farmers settled in the country who lost land between 2000 and 2001 under former President Robert Mugabe’s controversial programme of land reform designed to empower landless Black peasants could apply to get it back. To enforce this dubious arrangement, the government

Author, Noma Thata

Prison awaits ex-President Bill Clinton after child sex claims

By Nomazulu Thata        ACCORDING to unsealed documents belonging to Ghislaine Maxwell, former US president Bill Clinton is cited as one of the paedophiles who visited the Paedophile island belonging to Geffrey Epstein. Just when we thought it was disgusting for Clinton to deny any relationship with Monica Lewinsky, information reveals that he visited the island

Farai Gwenure

Zimbabwe, a crime scene with a flag

By Farai Gwenure Alberto is Agent Rachel’s ex-husband who occasionally clashed with the hostage negotiating expert in popular Netflix series called Money Heist. Typical behaviour in common break ups. Alberto’s prominence in the television show is based on his crime scene investigation capabilities. Beyond his eagle eye, he had ideas only he could ponder, thinking

Zimbabwe's commercial white farmers lost their land under the land reform programme

Zimbabwe’s unaffordable billion dollar deal

By Ringisai Chikohomero The broke Zimbabwean government has announced that it will pay white farmers a whopping US$3.5 billion as compensation for the losses incurred from the chaotic and ill-conceived Fast Track Land Reform Programme of 2000. The agreement, termed the Global Compensation Deed, was entered into between the government and the Commercial Farmers’ Union

I’m a Zimbabwean doctor. The crisis is even worse than you think

African Arguments You may have heard about the seven babies stillborn in Harare Hospital in one day at the end of July. From the maternity register that night, you can see that the infants were on average a healthy weight. They should have survived. The reason they died is because Zimbabwe’s health system is simply not

Hopewell Chin'ono

Chin’ono, Ngarivhume turn symbol of repression

By Panashe Chigumadzi On Aug. 7, Zimbabwean police transferred prominent journalist Hopewell Chin’ono and opposition leader Jacob Ngarivhume to the notorious Chikurubi Maximum Security Prison. Both figures were arrested last month and accused of inciting public violence — though, in reality, the violence came from the government itself. Now, the two prisoners of conscience —

Marshall Gore

Zimbabwe: Unity of Purpose Way Forward

By Cde Marshall Gore The events in our country in the past week have made me realise that without unity of purpose Zimbabwe will never move forward. The political tension on the ground and social unrest on social media resulting from our polarised politics is a cause for concern and now a hindrance to national

Presidents Emmerson Mnangagwa and Cyril Ramaphosa

For the sake of our economy, South Africa needs to act over Zimbabwe

By Mpumelelo Mkhabela  Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa threatened to “flush out” his opponents who mounted peaceful protests against the country’s deteriorating political and economic situation. His policy of “flushing out” is reminiscent of the apartheid era of torture, lengthy detentions and disappearances of political opponents. It is also a brutal reminder of Marumbatzvina – Robert

Journalist Hopewell Chin'ono

Fear is our biggest enemy

By Tendai Mazenge The main problem affecting our nation is our silence when everything around us has gone wrong. The political situation in our country is not right. People who dare speak about the evils of our government are abducted, tortured and thrown into prison. We need to stand up against these injustices. I believe

President Emmerson Mnangagwa

What’s happening in Zimbabwe regarding Covid-19?

News24 The Republic of Zimbabwe enforced one of the strictest nationwide lockdowns in Africa on Wednesday after the number of active coronavirus cases surpassed the number of recoveries in the country. However, activists and commentators believe the new lockdown measures were introduced in light of the arrest of award-winning Zimbabwean journalist Hopewell Chin’ono and a

July 31 protests a turning point for Zimbabwe

TimesLive Under cover of Covid-19, Zimbabwean authorities are preparing to arm the police with state of the art crowd control equipment to “crack down on lockdown violations” although the real agenda appears to be to quash opposition demonstrations. The opposition has called for street protests on July 31st given the deepening economic crisis and perceived

Alex Magaisa

EXCLUSIVE: Beneficiaries of the RBZ Farm Mechanisation Scheme

Alex T. Magaisa In 2007/08 the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe ran a scheme which was ostensibly designed to support commercial agriculture. At the time, Zimbabwe was undergoing a major land revolution, with significant changes in land ownership under the Fast Track Land Reform Programme (FTLRP) The government was that the new farmers needed support from

Alex Magaisa

Big Saturday Read: Zimbabwe – From Militarism to Constitutionalism

By Alex Magaisa This week, I participated in a Zoom Policy Dialogue Forum organised by SAPES, the Harare-based think-tank led by Dr Ibbo Mandaza. The dialogue was moderated by journalist Violet Gonda. My brief was to lead a discussion on constitutionalism and the military. It was a fascinating conversation in which former Minister, Professor Jonathan

Co-author Tsepang Nare

It’s a wild roller coaster ride to nowhere

By Tsepang T. Nare and Abel Mavura Its not just about dreaming that creates a visionary but its the art of one’s dream that creates a leader who is so rare. For a person with a disability (PWD), like any other, has that dream to live a life of dignity, where he/she is appreciated and

Zimbabwe- A case of resignation to fate or …

By Farai Nhende  A cursory glance at the history of post independent Zimbabwe provides compelling evidence pointing to the fact that there has been little in the way of organized or galvanized civic action against bad governance, either in its broadest sense or within the ambit of more context specific scenarios of holding to account