New Zimbabwe.com

Mnangagwa promises 78 new hospitals; rivals say he must stop writing new manifestos daily  

By Staff Reporter


PRESIDENT Emmerson Mnangagwa has produced a “pledge card” which he says ordinary Zimbabweans must use to evaluate his performance over the next five years.

The Zanu PF leader said in the “new Zimbabwe”, promises made during election campaigns should be “concrete and measurable”.

The ‘card’ was immediately mocked by the opposition which accused the president of trying to write “a new manifesto everyday”.

Addressing supporters on his Facebook page, Mnangagwa in a “new Zimbabwe”, leaders must be open, transparent and accountable to the people unlike under the last Robert Mugabe regime.

The “pledge card”, Mnangagwa explained, should be considered a coupon for progress and a certificate of trust between citizens and him.

“I invite everyone to keep hold of these cards and hold me accountable for these pledges,” he said.

The card features five direct promises to be realised over the next five years including the creation of thousands of jobs in agriculture, mining and tourism and zero tolerance to corruption.

“Anyone found guilty of corruption will be immediately fired and punished accordingly; no one is above the law,” he said.

The Zanu PF leader also pledged to reduce hospital fees by 50%, improve the supply of critical drugs, guarantee free health care to all cancer patients and to build 78 new hospitals s.

The ‘pledge card’ was however mocked by opposition Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) spokesperson Jacob Mafume.

“This man cannot keep writing a manifesto every day. He is part of the people who promised a better Zimbabwe in 1980 and nothing happened,” said Jacob Mafume.

“They had a leadership code which they never followed; how will he follow this no-name pledge like the no-name manifesto?”

Zimbabwe goes to the polls on July 30 with Mnangagwa looking to seal his hold on the presidency after assuming power through a military revolt last November.

New ZimbabweMnangagwa promises 78 new hospitals; rivals say he must stop writing new manifestos daily