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Mwonzora claims high level engagements with CCC & Zanu PF; rival scorns claim, says he must be taking ‘something strong’ 

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By Leopold Munhende, Chief Correspondent 


MDC Alliance President Douglas Mwonzora has claimed his party, the Citizens Coalition for Change (CCC) and the ruling Zanu PF have been engaged in “high level” discussions since early last year.

Mwonzora, who is on record calling for an election moratorium, was speaking at a press conference where he called for a Government of National Unity (GNU) akin to the one established in 2009.

Zimbabwe is set to hold general elections between July and August this year.

According to Mwonzora the CCC is being represented by want-away secretary general Charlton Hwende while Zanu PF has delegated the duties to former Energy Minister Fortune Chasi.

“This is a platform that is made up of secretary generals or their equivalent from parties involved,” said Mwonzora.

“It (platform) is talking about electoral reforms, peace and reconciliation and the need to get rid of hate language but, as I said, it is low-key and not involving leaders of parties.

“It has been there for quite some time, since the formation of the CCC (which) is represented by Charlton Hwende while Chasi and Munyaradzi Paul Mangwana are representing Zanu PF.

“In 2008 people talked and things became better for the people of Zimbabwe. There should be talks so that the people of Zimbabwe benefit; no one can argue against the fact that things got better during the GNU and that is the solution we think is best for this country.”

Zanu PF’s Fortune Chasi

Mwonzora and CCC leader Nelson Chamisa have not seen eye-to-eye since the former dumped him and took the MDC Alliance name which he not only used to take over properties previously under his control but also to recall legislators sympathetic to his cause.

Reached by newzimbabwe.com for comment on the talks claim, CCC deputy national spokesperson Ostallos Siziba dismissively quipped; “Mwonzora is on something strong.”

The CCC has been headstrong in not entertaining any dialogue platform fronted by Zanu PF or its leader President Emmerson Mnangagwa. It has also refused to consider a GNU as a solution to Zimbabwe’s mounting challenges.

Zimbabweans, some of whom got a taste of a well-governed country during the 2009-2013 GNU era, are divided over the matter. While others view it as a stop-gap measure to help heal the country’s bleeding economy some argue it will only serve Zanu PF.

“Zimbabwe, like Rhodesia before it has reached a ‘Lancaster House’ moment, a point at which there is no possible solution without coherent regional and international action,” reads an analysis by academics Ibbo Mandaza and Tony Reeler, co-conveners of the Platform for Concerned Citizens.

“Of course, Zimbabwe isn’t in the middle of a civil war, but its political polarisation is so entrenched that negotiation is the only way forward, and that will require mediation of a serious and sustained kind. President Emmerson’s political actor’s dialogue isn’t taken seriously by credible opposition politicians.”