New Zimbabwe.com

Sikhala, Ngarivhume vow more govt resistance

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By Costa Nkomo


DEFIANT opposition MDC Alliance deputy chairperson Job Sikhala has threatened unspecified action against President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s government in the wake of a corruption storm involving Zimbabwe miners boss Henrietta Rushwaya.

Rushwaya was busted at the Robert Gabriel Mugabe International Airport Monday last week while trying to smuggle 6kg gold to Dubai.

An alleged accomplice to the offence, one Gift Karanda, an employee of Rushwaya’s Zimbabwe Miners Federation, claimed the loot belonged to President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s wife, Auxillia and son Collins.

The claims, later disputed by police in a weekend statement absolving the first family, have evoked the July 31 spirit in which Sikhala and Ngarivhume were calling for national demonstrations against high level corruption under the Zanu PF led regime’s watch.

Sikhala and Ngarivhume were arrested on different occasions to later spend a month each in remand prison, charged with inciting public violence against government.

“The spirit of the 31 July demonstration must live on,” Ngarivhume wrote on Twitter Saturday.

“According to the regime, it (protest) was a total failure but I believe it was the start. 31 July is now a grassroots apolitical resistance movement to fight corruption, restore democracy and bring economic freedom.”

Sikhala warned Mnangagwa to brace for the unknown January next year.

“They don’t want us to say it out when their footprints of looting are everywhere. We will not stop saying it, will not stop urging people into action. January is coming. I say January is coming,” Sikhala wrote on Twitter Sunday.

The Zengeza West legislator later told NewZimbabwe.com he was not going to reveal the nature of resistance he was planning.

“We will not announce this time around,” Sikhala said.

Rushwaya’s attempts at smuggling the loot also grabbed international headlines with the British House of Lords last week suggesting Mnangagwa’s unrepentant government was ripe for more restrictive measures.